St Michael, Hertfordshire

St Michael, Hertfordshire

St Michael

St Michael

St Michael shown within Hertfordshire

Area
8.2 sq mi (21 km2)

Population
477 (2011)[1]

• Density
58/sq mi (22/km2)

OS grid reference
TL113071

Civil parish

St Michael

District

St Albans

Shire county

Hertfordshire

Region

East

Country
England

Sovereign state
United Kingdom

Post town
ST AlBANS

Postcode district
AL3

Dialling code
01727

Police
Hertfordshire

Fire
Hertfordshire

Ambulance
East of England

EU Parliament
East of England

UK Parliament

St Albans

List of places
UK
England
HertfordshireCoordinates: 51°45′05″N 0°23′10″W / 51.751389°N 0.386111°W / 51.751389; -0.386111

St Michael is a civil parish part of the City and District of St Albans in Hertfordshire, England.[2] From 1894 to 1974 the parish was known as St Michael Rural. The population in 2001 was 494.[3] The local council is St Michael Parish Council.
History[edit]
St Michael was an ancient parish. Part of the parish was within the Municipal Borough of St Albans until 1894, when it was split to create St Michael Urban in the borough and St Michael Rural outside.[4] St Michael Rural became part of St Albans Rural District.
Parts of St Michael Rural were transferred to the borough of St Albans in 1913 (138 acres) and 1935 (890 acres).
On 1 April 1974 the parish of St Michael Rural was split with part going to the unparished area in Dacorum and the rest becoming the parish of St Michael in the City of St Albans district.
Geography[edit]
It comprises a wholly rural area to the west of St Albans and is bounded on its western side by Hemel Hempstead. The parish is bisected by the M1 motorway.
Settlement is dispersed across a number of small and isolated hamlets:

Appspond
Breakspears
Bushwood
Childwickbury
Gorhambury
Potters Crouch

References[edit]

^ http://www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk/dissemination/LeadTableView.do?a=7&b=11128795&c=st+michael&d=16&e=62&g=6434494&i=1001x1003x1032x1004&m=0&r=1&s=1385656972114&enc=1&dsFamilyId=2473
^ Listing for St Michael Parish Council
^ Neighbourhood statistics St Michael CP, Accessed 26 January 2013
^ http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43300

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Civil parishes of Hertfordshire

Broxbourne

Unparished areas

Cheshunt
Hoddesdon

Dacorum

Parishes

Aldbury

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Swimming at the 2016 Summer Paralympics – Women’s 100 metre breaststroke SB11

Women’s 100 metre breaststroke SB11
at the XV Paralympic Games

Venue
Olympic Aquatics Stadium

Dates
13 September 2016

Competitors
7 from 7 nations

Medalists

01 !

Zhang, XiaotongXiaotong Zhang
 China

02 !

Bruinsma, LiesetteLiesette Bruinsma
 Netherlands

03 !

Reichard, MajaMaja Reichard
 Sweden

Swimming at the
2016 Summer Paralympics

Women’s events

50 m freestyle
S4
S5
S6
S7
S8

S9
S10
S11
S12
S13

100 m freestyle
S3
S5
S6
S7
S8

S9
S10
S11
S13

200 m freestyle
S5
S14

400 m freestyle
S6
S7
S8
S9
S10

S11
S13

50 m backstroke
S2
S3
S4
S5

100 m backstroke
S2
S6
S7
S8
S9

S10
S11
S12
S13
S14

50 m breaststroke
SB3

100 m breaststroke
SB4
SB5
SB6
SB7
SB8

SB9
SB11
SB13
SB14

50 m butterfly
S5
S6
S7

100 m butterfly
S8
S9
S10
S13

150 m medley
SM4

200 m medley
SM6
SM7
SM8
SM9
SM10

SM11
SM13
SM14

Freestyle relay
4 × 100 m (34pts)

Medley relay
4 × 100 m (34pts)

The women’s 100 metre breaststroke SB11 event at the 2016 Paralympic Games took place on 13 September 2016, at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium. No heats were held.
Final[edit]
18:52 13 September 2016: [1]

Rank
Lane
Name
Nationality
Time
Notes

01 !
3
Zhang, XiaotongXiaotong Zhang
 China
1:23.02
WR

02 !
4
Bruinsma, LiesetteLiesette Bruinsma
 Netherlands
1:25.81

03 !
5
Reichard, MajaMaja Reichard
 Sweden
1:26.60

4
6
Berezhna, YanaYana Berezhna
 Ukraine
1:28.04

5
2
Baez, NadiaNadia Baez
 Argentina
1:35.51

6
7
Martinez, LetticiaLetticia Martinez
 United States
1:38.22

7
1
Rabbolini, MartinaMartina Rabbolini
 Italy
1:38.81

Notes[edit]

^ “Women’s 100m Breaststroke – SB11 – Final”. Rio 2016 Paralympic Games. Retrieved 7 October 2016. 

paralympics portal
swimming portal

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Ferrar Glacier

The Ferrar Glacier

Ferrar Glacier is a glacier in Antarctica. It is about 35 miles (56 km) long, flowing from the plateau of Victoria Land west of the Royal Society Range to New Harbour in McMurdo Sound. The glacier makes a right (east) turn northeast of Knobhead, where it is apposed, i.e., joined in Siamese-twin fashion, to Taylor Glacier. From there, it continues east along the south side of the Kukri Hills to New Harbour.
It was discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition, (1901–04) under Captain Robert Falcon Scott, who named this feature for Hartley T. Ferrar, geologist of the expedition. The name Ferrar Glacier was originally applied both to the part of this glacier below its right turn and to the present Taylor Glacier. Thomas Griffith Taylor, geologist of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, under Scott, found evidence that these are not two parts of a single glacier but are two glaciers apposed. With this discovery Scott gave the names Ferrar Glacier and Taylor Glacier essentially as now applied; the Taylor Glacier makes a left turn at Cavendish Rocks and drains east along the north side of the Kukri Hills.[1]
See also[edit]

Dun Glacier
List of glaciers in the Antarctic

References[edit]

^ “Ferrar Glacier”. Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-03-21. 

External links[edit]

“Ferrar Glacier”. NASA Earth Observatory. Archived from the original on 2008-09-24. Retrieved 2008-01-26. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document “Ferrar Glacier” (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
Coordinates: 77°49′S 162°42′E / 77.817°S 162.700°E / -77.817; 162.700

This Scott Coast location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Ilya Schor

Ilya Schor

Ilya Schor, 1940s

Born
April 16, 1904
Zloczow

Died
June 7, 1961(1961-06-07) (aged 57)
New York City

Known for
Painter, Jeweler, Engraver, & Sculptor

Ilya Schor (16 April 1904, in Zloczow – 7 June 1961, in New York City) was a multi-faceted artist, a painter, jeweler, engraver, sculptor, and renowned artist of Judaica.

Contents

1 Early life
2 Later life and work
3 Gallery
4 Bibliography
5 External links

Early life[edit]
Ilya Schor was born in Zloczow (Galicia), in the Austrian Empire, later Poland, in 1904. He came from a deeply Hasidic family. His father Naftali Schorr was a folk-artist, painting colorfully illustrated store signs for local merchants. Ilya Schor first trained as an apprentice in metalcrafts and engraving before enrolling at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts in 1930 where he studied painting. In 1937, he was awarded a grant by the Polish government to study in Paris. He exhibited successfully at the Salon d’Automne in 1938. Ilya Schor and his artist wife Resia Schor immigrated to the United States in December, 1941, from Marseilles, via Lisbon, after fleeing Paris in late May 1940. Ilya Schor and Resia Schor had two daughters, born in New York City: artist and writer Mira Schor (b. 1950) and noted literary scholar and theorist, Naomi Schor (1943–2001).

Ilya Schor, 1960, photo Ryszard Horowitz

Later life and work[edit]
In New York City, Ilya Schor began artwork that would keep fresh his memories of life of the Jews of the shtetls of Eastern Europe, working in the many materials and with the numerous skills at his disposal. He worked on major commissions for synagogues in the United States. Schor’s wood-engraving illustrations for The Earth is The Lord’s and The Sabbath, both important writings by the renowned philosopher and theologian, Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, and for Adventures of Mottel The Cantor’s Son by Sholem Aleichem, have remained in print for over fifty years. Rabbi Heschel wrote of Schor’s work, “In the stillness of the precious images Ilya Schor has called into being, generations to come will hear the voice and the spirit of eternal Israel, the inwardness and piety of our people of Eastern Europe.” Schor was also the creator of unique jewelry and small Judaica objects in silver and gold. In later years he also worked on abstract sculptures in brass and copper.
His work was exhibited at The Salpeter Gallery in New York 1953, the Museum of Contemporary Art in

Domon

Domon is a surname, belonging to several languages, and may refer to:
People[edit]

Alice Domon 1937 – Missing: 1977), French, Roman Catholic nun
Eduard Domon, former IBM researcher

Domon group, interdisciplinary research group founded by Eduard Domon

Jin Domon (born 1972), Japanese voice actor
Ken Domon (1909 – 1990), Japanese photographer

Fictional characters[edit]

Domon Kasshu, main character from the fictional anime and manga series G Gundam
Bayle Domon, character in American author Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series
Naoki Domon (a.k.a. BlueRacer), one of the main heroes in Gekisou Sentai Carranger

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Domon.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

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Mircea Eliade bibliography

This is a bibliography of works by Mircea Eliade.

Contents

1 Scholarly works
2 Fiction
3 Other
4 References

Scholarly works[edit]

The Comparative History of Yoga Techniques, 1933
Oceanografie, 1934
Alchimia Asiatică, 1934
Yoga: Essai sur les origines de la mystique indienne, 1936
Cosmologie şi alchimie babiloniană, 1937
Fragmentarium, 1939
Comentarii la legenda Meşterului Manole, 1943
Techniques du Yoga, 1948
Traité d’histoire des religions, 1949 – Patterns in Comparative Religion
Le Chamanisme et les techniques archaïques de l’extase, 1951 – Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy
Images et Symboles, 1952 – Images and Symbols
Forgerons et alchimistes, 1956 – The Forge and the Crucible
Cosmos and History: The Myth of the Eternal Return, translated: W.R. Trask. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1954. Originally published as Le Mythe de l’eternel retour: archétypes et répetition, 1949.
Yoga, Immortality and Freedom, translated: W.R. Trask. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1958. First published in French as Yoga: Essai sur l’origine de la mystique Indienne in 1933.
Rites and Symbols of Initiation (Birth and Rebirth), translated: W. Trask, London: Harvill Press, 1958. The publication of Eliade’s 1956 Haskell Lectures at the University of Chicago, Patterns of Initiation.
Patterns in Comparative Religion, translated: R. Sheed, London: Sheed and Ward, 1958.
The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion, translated from French: W.R. Trask, Harvest/HBJ Publishers, 1957 ISBN 0-15-679201-X.
Myths, Dreams and Mysteries: the Encounter between Contemporary Faiths and Archaic Realities, translated: P. Mairet, London: Harvill Press, 1959.
Images and Symbols: Studies in Religious Symbolism, translated: P. Mairet, London: Harvill Press, 1961.
Patanjali et Yoga, 1962 – Patanjali and Yoga
Myth and Reality, translated: W. Trask, New York: Harper and Row, 1963.
Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy, translated: W.R. Trask. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1964. Originally published Le Chamanisme, 1951.
The Two and the One, translated: J.M. Cohen, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1965.
The Quest: History and Meaning in Religion, London: University of Chicago Press, 1969.
De Zalmoxis à Gengis-Khan. Études comparatives sur les religions et le folklore de la Dacie et de l’Europe orientale, Payot, 1970
Zalmoxis, The Vanishing God, The University of Chicago Press, 1972.
Australian Religions, Cornell University Press, 1973
Occultism, W

Cliff Lee (outfielder)

Not to be confused with Cliff Lee (pitcher).

Cliff Lee

Outfielder

Born: (1896-08-04)August 4, 1896
Lexington, Nebraska

Died: August 25, 1980(1980-08-25) (aged 84)
Denver, Colorado

Batted: Right
Threw: Right

MLB debut

May 15, 1919, for the Pittsburgh Pirates

Last MLB appearance

September 8, 1926, for the Cleveland Indians

MLB statistics

Batting average
.300

Home runs
38

Runs batted in
216

Teams

Pittsburgh Pirates (1919–20)
Philadelphia Phillies (1921–24)
Cleveland Indians (1924)
Cincinnati Reds (1925–26)

Clifford Walker Lee (August 4, 1896 – August 25, 1980) was a professional baseball player. He played all or part of eight seasons in Major League Baseball, from 1919 1926, for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies, Cleveland Indians, and Cincinnati Reds. While he was primarily an outfielder, he also played quite a few games as a first baseman and catcher.
External links[edit]

Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)

This biographical article relating to an American baseball outfielder born in the 1890s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Magnolia Depot (Mississippi)

Magnolia Depot (Mississippi)

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

Mississippi Landmark

Magnolia Depot, circa 1960s

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Location
101 E. Railroad Avenue
Magnolia, Mississippi

Coordinates
31°8′38″N 90°27′28″W / 31.14389°N 90.45778°W / 31.14389; -90.45778Coordinates: 31°8′38″N 90°27′28″W / 31.14389°N 90.45778°W / 31.14389; -90.45778

Area
less than one acre

Built
c. 1895

Architectural style
Queen Anne

MPS
[1]

NRHP Reference #
84000045[1]

USMS #
113-MAG-0201-NR-ML

Significant dates

Added to NRHP
October 11, 1984

Designated USMS
September 14, 2006[2]

Magnolia Depot is a historic railway station located at 101 E. Railroad Avenue, in Magnolia, Mississippi.[3] The depot was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 and was designated a Mississippi Landmark in 2006.[1][2]
Description[edit]
In 1893, a fire destroyed Magnolia’s railway depot that was constructed in 1856.[3][4] Between 1893 and 1895, the present structure was built on the same site, next to the Illinois Central Railroad.[3]
The depot is a one-story, wood-frame building with a rectangular floor plan.[1] It was designed to accommodate both freight and passengers at the turn of the 20th century, when Magnolia served as a resort destination.[2] The depot has a gable roof design with wide eaves. The track side of the building was designed with irregular placement of sash windows, a bay window, single entrance doors, and freight doors. The opposite side of the building had single entrance doors and sash windows.
Restoration[edit]
By 1982, the building was used as an antique store and no longer served as a railway station.[1] During the first decade of the 21st century, the City of Magnolia acquired the property for use as a city hall.[4] Because of the structure’s age and deterioration of the foundation, complete exterior restoration was required, but the original windows and siding were retained for historical integrity.[4] New exterior doors were installed, and the freight doors were removed and were replaced with windows. For the interior, original doors, wood flooring, and beadboard walls were retained and restored. Renovation also included new plumbing and electrical wiring.[4]
Grants for restoration were provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History and the Mississippi Department of Transportation
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Alpheus Jones House

Alpheus Jones House

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

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Location
Northeast of Raleigh on US 401, near Raleigh, North Carolina

Coordinates
35°51′50″N 78°32′50″W / 35.86389°N 78.54722°W / 35.86389; -78.54722Coordinates: 35°51′50″N 78°32′50″W / 35.86389°N 78.54722°W / 35.86389; -78.54722

Area
3 acres (1.2 ha)

Built
1847 (1847)

Architectural style
Greek Revival

NRHP Reference #
75001295[1]

Added to NRHP
July 7, 1975

Alpheus Jones House, also known as Seth Jones 1847 Restaurant, is a historic home located near Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina. It was built in 1847, and is a two-story, rectangular, vernacular Greek Revival-style frame dwelling with a hipped roof. It is sheathed in weatherboard, sits on an ashlar foundation, and has a rear extension and kitchen wing. The front facade features a reconstructed two-story double Doric order portico. The house was restored in 1968, and renovated to house a restaurant.[2]
It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.[1]
References[edit]

^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). “National Register Information System”. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
^ Robert Topkins and Mary Alice Hinson (June 1975). “Alpheus Jones House” (pdf). National Register of Historic Places – Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2015-05-01. 

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U.S. National Register of Historic Places in North Carolina

Topics

Contributing property
Keeper of the Register
Historic district
History of the National Register of Historic Places
National Park Service
Property types

Lists
by county

Alamance
Alexander
Alleghany
Anson
Ashe
Avery
Beaufort
Bertie
Bladen
Brunswick
Buncombe
Burke
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Camden
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Caswell
Catawba
Chatham
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Chowan
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Currituck
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Durham
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Person
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Polk
Randolph
Richmond
Robeson
Rockingham
Rowan
Rutherford
Sampson
Scotl

Khjdabad railway station

Khjdabad railway station

Owned by
Ministry of Railways

Other information

Station code
KBW[1]

History

Previous names
Great Indian Peninsula Railway

Khjdabad railway station (Urdu: کھجدآباد ریلوے اسٹیشن ‎) is located in Pakistan.
See also[edit]

List of railway stations in Pakistan
Pakistan Railways

References[edit]

^ Official Web Site of Pakistan Railways

External links[edit]

Official Web Site of Pakistan Railways

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Railway stations in Pakistan

Railway stations by province

Balochistan

Aab-e-gum
Ahmedwal
Alam Reg
Azad
Bakhtiarabad Domki
Beleli
Bostan
Chaman
Dalbandin
Damboli
Dera Allah Yar
Dera Murad Jamali
Dingra
Dozan
Galangur
Gat
Gulistan
Hirok
Khan Muhammad Chah
Kishingi
Koh-e-Taftan
Kolpur
Kuchlak
Mach
Mangoli
Mirjaveh
Mushkaf
Nok Kundi
Nushki
Nuttall
Padag Road
Perak
Pehro Kunri
Panir
Peshi
Qilla Abdullah
Quetta
Sar-i-Ab
Sheikh Mandah
Sheikh Wasil
Sibi Junction
Spezand Junction
Shela Bagh
Tozghi
Wali Khan
Yakmach
Yaru

Tribal Areas

Shahgai
Landi Khana
Landi Kotal

Capital Territory

Islamabad
Golra Sharif Junction

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

Akora Khattak
Baldher
Burhan
Charsadda
Faqirabad
Hayat Sher Pao Shahid
Haripur Hazara
Havelian
Jamrud
Jhangira Road
Khairabad Kund
Khushhal
Kot Najib Ullah
Mardan Junction
Nasarpur
Nowshera Junction
Peshawar City
Peshawar Cantonment
Pir Piai
Pabbi
Rumian
Sanjwal
Serai Saleh
Taru Jabba

Punjab

Attock City Junction
Attock Khurd
Bahawalpur
Chiniot
Faisalabad
Gujar Khan
Gujrat
Jallo
Jhang Sadar
Khanewal Junction
Khanpur
Lahore Junction
Lahore Cantonment
Liaquat Pur
Moghalpura Junction
Mudduki
Multan Cantonment
Rahim Yar Khan
Rawalpindi
Sargodha Junction
Sialkot Junction
Tariqabad
Vehari
Wagah

Sindh

Abad
Allahdino Sand
Arian Road
Badin
Bandhi
Begmanji
Bhiria Road
Bholari
Bin Qasim
Braudabad
Bucheri
Chor
Dabheji
Daharki
Dandot
Daur
Departure Yard
Detha
Drigh Road
Gambat
Ghotki
Gosarji
Habib Kot
Hyderabad Junction
Jacobabad Junction
Jalal Marri
Jamrao Junction
Jhimpir
Jummah Goth
Jungshahi
Karachi Cantonment
Karachi City
Khairpur
Khokhrapar
Kiamari
Kotri Junction
Kot Lalloo
Lakha Road
Landhi Junction
Lundo
Machi Goth
Mando Dairo
Mahesar
Mahrabpur Junction
Malir Cantonment
Matli
Meting
Mirpur Mathelo
Mirpur Khas
Nawabshah Junction
Norai Sharif
Oderolal
Pad Idan Junction
Pano Akil
Palijani
Pir Katpar
Pithoro Junction
Rashidabad Halt
Ran Pethani
Ranipur Riyasat
Reti
Rohri Junction
Sarhad
Sangi
Sarhari
Setharja

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