Monthly Archives:2월 2017

Cypress Creek High School (Orlando, Florida)

Cypress Creek High School

Location

Orlando (Orange County), Florida
U.S.

Information

Type
Public Secondary

Established
1992

School district
Orange County Public Schools

Principal
Dr. W. John McHale

Grades
9–12

Enrollment
3,302

Color(s)
Maroon, Silver, Black, and White

Mascot
Bear

Rival
Pikete

National ranking
1651

Motto
To lead our students to success with the support and involvement of families and the community. To be the top producer of successful students in the nation.

Website
CCHS

Cypress Creek High School is located in south Orlando, Florida and serves students in grades 9 through 12.
Cypress Creek is an IB World School with an International Baccalaureate Diploma Program.[1] As an IB World School, CCHS is a local magnet school allowing students from other Orange County, Florida schools to attend.[2]
Cypress Creek High School receives graduating students from Meadow Woods Middle School, South Creek Middle School and Walker Middle School. However,,, it is a magnet school, so students from surrounding middle schools (e.g. Hunters Creek Middle School, Freedom Middle School, Westridge Middle School, Lake Nona Middle School, Southwest Middle School) also attend Cypress Creek albeit in smaller numbers.

Contents

1 Band
2 IB Diploma Program
3 Notable people
4 References
5 External links

Band[edit]

The CCHS Marching Band at the Bands of America Orlando Regional in October 2000.

The Cypress Creek Marching Band is a seven-time Florida Marching Band Coalition Class 4A Champion (in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2007, and 2010) and was named Grand Champion an unprecedented five times (1998–2002) before FMBC eliminated the Grand Champion title (now only class champions are named)[3] The marching band was a Bands of America Grand Nationals Semi-Finalist two times, in 2000 and 2002, finishing in the top 20.
The Cypress Creek Wind Ensemble has been guest-conducted by composers including Karel Husa (in 1996) and David Holsinger (in 2002). The group has performed at venues and festivals including Bands of America Marching and Concert Festivals in 1997 and 2000, and Carnegie Hall in April 2009. The Wind Ensemble also recently performed for the second time at the Music for All National Concert Band Festival in Indianapolis, Indiana.[4]
The Cypress Creek High School Winter Guard has competed in the Dayton, Ohio WGI World Championships since 1999. They have been finalists in the WGI competitions seven times since the sc

Slidre

Road past Slidredomen

Slidre is the administrative centre of Vestre Slidre municipality, Norway. [1]
Slidre (with its surrounding areas) was established as a municipality January 1, 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt). It was divided into Vestre Slidre and Øystre Slidre in 1849. It is located by the Slidrefjord. Its population (SSB 2005) is 293. Slidre is the site of the medieval era, stone church Slidredomen (Slidre kyrkje). [2]
References[edit]

^ “Slidre – tettsted”. Store norske leksikon. Retrieved October 1, 2016. 
^ Sigrid Christie, Ola Storsletten, Anne Marta Hoff. “Slidre kirke”. Norges Kirker. Retrieved October 1, 2016.  CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)

Coordinates: 61°5′17″N 8°58′48″E / 61.08806°N 8.98000°E / 61.08806; 8.98000

This Oppland location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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일산오피

Jane Octavia Brookfield

Jane Octavia Brookfield

Portrait of Brookfield in 1859 by Charles Albert Ludovici

Born
Jane Octavia Elton
(1821-03-25)25 March 1821
Clifton, Nr. Bristol

Died
27 November 1896(1896-11-27) (aged 75)
Chelsea, London

Nationality
British

Occupation
Author

Spouse(s)
William Henry Brookfield

Children
Arthur Montagu Brookfield (1853–1940) and Charles Hallam Elton Brookfield (1857–1913)

Parents

Charles Abraham Elton (father)
Sarah Smith (mother)

Jane Octavia Brookfield (25 March 1821 – 27 November 1896) was a literary hostess and writer, best known for her platonic friendship with William Makepeace Thackeray, and the four indifferent novels she wrote.

Contents

1 Biography
2 Family
3 Works
4 Notes
5 References

Biography[edit]
Brookfield was born on 25 March 1821, the youngest daughter of Sir Charles Abraham Elton, a former soldier. She lived with her seven sisters and five brothers, along with her father and mother Sarah in Clevedon Court, near Bristol. Sir Charles was a published author, writing a elegy about two of his sons who had drowned in the Bristol Channel, and was friends with both Charles Lamb and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.[1]
In 1837, the family moved to Southampton, and due to Jane’s height her father nicknamed her “Glumdalclitch”. In 1838 she was courted by and became engaged to William Henry Brookfield, the priest at the local church, twelve years her senior. After he found a better job, as curate of St James’s Church, Piccadilly, the couple married on 18 November 1841.[1]
Jane maintained an influential literary salon, which included among others Thackeray and her husband’s old college friend Alfred Tennyson. It was her close friendship with Thackeray for which she is best remembered and in the mid-1840s they were on intimate terms. D. J. Taylor in her biography in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography states “the relationship between him and Jane was almost certainly not sexual (there may have been a chaste embrace or two …)”.[1] Thackeray incorporated some of her characteristics in to two of his characters: Amelia Sedley in Vanity Fair (1848), and Laura Bell in Pendennis (1850).[1]
Family[edit]
The couple were survived by their two sons Arthur Montagu Brookfield (1853–1940) who became a British army officer, diplomat author and Conservative politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1885 to 1903; and Charles Hallam Elton Brookfield (1857–1913) an actor.[1]
Works[edit]

Influence. A Novel.

강남오피

St Michael, Hertfordshire

St Michael

St Michael

St Michael shown within Hertfordshire

Area
8.2 sq mi (21 km2)

Population
477 (2011)[1]

• Density
58/sq mi (22/km2)

OS grid reference
TL113071

Civil parish

St Michael

District

St Albans

Shire county

Hertfordshire

Region

East

Country
England

Sovereign state
United Kingdom

Post town
ST AlBANS

Postcode district
AL3

Dialling code
01727

Police
Hertfordshire

Fire
Hertfordshire

Ambulance
East of England

EU Parliament
East of England

UK Parliament

St Albans

List of places
UK
England
HertfordshireCoordinates: 51°45′05″N 0°23′10″W / 51.751389°N 0.386111°W / 51.751389; -0.386111

St Michael is a civil parish part of the City and District of St Albans in Hertfordshire, England.[2] From 1894 to 1974 the parish was known as St Michael Rural. The population in 2001 was 494.[3] The local council is St Michael Parish Council.
History[edit]
St Michael was an ancient parish. Part of the parish was within the Municipal Borough of St Albans until 1894, when it was split to create St Michael Urban in the borough and St Michael Rural outside.[4] St Michael Rural became part of St Albans Rural District.
Parts of St Michael Rural were transferred to the borough of St Albans in 1913 (138 acres) and 1935 (890 acres).
On 1 April 1974 the parish of St Michael Rural was split with part going to the unparished area in Dacorum and the rest becoming the parish of St Michael in the City of St Albans district.
Geography[edit]
It comprises a wholly rural area to the west of St Albans and is bounded on its western side by Hemel Hempstead. The parish is bisected by the M1 motorway.
Settlement is dispersed across a number of small and isolated hamlets:

Appspond
Breakspears
Bushwood
Childwickbury
Gorhambury
Potters Crouch

References[edit]

^ http://www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk/dissemination/LeadTableView.do?a=7&b=11128795&c=st+michael&d=16&e=62&g=6434494&i=1001x1003x1032x1004&m=0&r=1&s=1385656972114&enc=1&dsFamilyId=2473
^ Listing for St Michael Parish Council
^ Neighbourhood statistics St Michael CP, Accessed 26 January 2013
^ http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=43300

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Civil parishes of Hertfordshire

Broxbourne

Unparished areas

Cheshunt
Hoddesdon

Dacorum

Parishes

Aldbury

일본야동

Swimming at the 2016 Summer Paralympics – Women’s 100 metre breaststroke SB11

Women’s 100 metre breaststroke SB11
at the XV Paralympic Games

Venue
Olympic Aquatics Stadium

Dates
13 September 2016

Competitors
7 from 7 nations

Medalists

01 !

Zhang, XiaotongXiaotong Zhang
 China

02 !

Bruinsma, LiesetteLiesette Bruinsma
 Netherlands

03 !

Reichard, MajaMaja Reichard
 Sweden

Swimming at the
2016 Summer Paralympics

Women’s events

50 m freestyle
S4
S5
S6
S7
S8

S9
S10
S11
S12
S13

100 m freestyle
S3
S5
S6
S7
S8

S9
S10
S11
S13

200 m freestyle
S5
S14

400 m freestyle
S6
S7
S8
S9
S10

S11
S13

50 m backstroke
S2
S3
S4
S5

100 m backstroke
S2
S6
S7
S8
S9

S10
S11
S12
S13
S14

50 m breaststroke
SB3

100 m breaststroke
SB4
SB5
SB6
SB7
SB8

SB9
SB11
SB13
SB14

50 m butterfly
S5
S6
S7

100 m butterfly
S8
S9
S10
S13

150 m medley
SM4

200 m medley
SM6
SM7
SM8
SM9
SM10

SM11
SM13
SM14

Freestyle relay
4 × 100 m (34pts)

Medley relay
4 × 100 m (34pts)

The women’s 100 metre breaststroke SB11 event at the 2016 Paralympic Games took place on 13 September 2016, at the Olympic Aquatics Stadium. No heats were held.
Final[edit]
18:52 13 September 2016: [1]

Rank
Lane
Name
Nationality
Time
Notes

01 !
3
Zhang, XiaotongXiaotong Zhang
 China
1:23.02
WR

02 !
4
Bruinsma, LiesetteLiesette Bruinsma
 Netherlands
1:25.81

03 !
5
Reichard, MajaMaja Reichard
 Sweden
1:26.60

4
6
Berezhna, YanaYana Berezhna
 Ukraine
1:28.04

5
2
Baez, NadiaNadia Baez
 Argentina
1:35.51

6
7
Martinez, LetticiaLetticia Martinez
 United States
1:38.22

7
1
Rabbolini, MartinaMartina Rabbolini
 Italy
1:38.81

Notes[edit]

^ “Women’s 100m Breaststroke – SB11 – Final”. Rio 2016 Paralympic Games. Retrieved 7 October 2016. 

paralympics portal
swimming portal

연예인야동

Ferrar Glacier

The Ferrar Glacier

Ferrar Glacier is a glacier in Antarctica. It is about 35 miles (56 km) long, flowing from the plateau of Victoria Land west of the Royal Society Range to New Harbour in McMurdo Sound. The glacier makes a right (east) turn northeast of Knobhead, where it is apposed, i.e., joined in Siamese-twin fashion, to Taylor Glacier. From there, it continues east along the south side of the Kukri Hills to New Harbour.
It was discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition, (1901–04) under Captain Robert Falcon Scott, who named this feature for Hartley T. Ferrar, geologist of the expedition. The name Ferrar Glacier was originally applied both to the part of this glacier below its right turn and to the present Taylor Glacier. Thomas Griffith Taylor, geologist of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, under Scott, found evidence that these are not two parts of a single glacier but are two glaciers apposed. With this discovery Scott gave the names Ferrar Glacier and Taylor Glacier essentially as now applied; the Taylor Glacier makes a left turn at Cavendish Rocks and drains east along the north side of the Kukri Hills.[1]
See also[edit]

Dun Glacier
List of glaciers in the Antarctic

References[edit]

^ “Ferrar Glacier”. Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-03-21. 

External links[edit]

“Ferrar Glacier”. NASA Earth Observatory. Archived from the original on 2008-09-24. Retrieved 2008-01-26. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document “Ferrar Glacier” (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
Coordinates: 77°49′S 162°42′E / 77.817°S 162.700°E / -77.817; 162.700

This Scott Coast location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Ilya Schor

Ilya Schor

Ilya Schor, 1940s

Born
April 16, 1904
Zloczow

Died
June 7, 1961(1961-06-07) (aged 57)
New York City

Known for
Painter, Jeweler, Engraver, & Sculptor

Ilya Schor (16 April 1904, in Zloczow – 7 June 1961, in New York City) was a multi-faceted artist, a painter, jeweler, engraver, sculptor, and renowned artist of Judaica.

Contents

1 Early life
2 Later life and work
3 Gallery
4 Bibliography
5 External links

Early life[edit]
Ilya Schor was born in Zloczow (Galicia), in the Austrian Empire, later Poland, in 1904. He came from a deeply Hasidic family. His father Naftali Schorr was a folk-artist, painting colorfully illustrated store signs for local merchants. Ilya Schor first trained as an apprentice in metalcrafts and engraving before enrolling at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts in 1930 where he studied painting. In 1937, he was awarded a grant by the Polish government to study in Paris. He exhibited successfully at the Salon d’Automne in 1938. Ilya Schor and his artist wife Resia Schor immigrated to the United States in December, 1941, from Marseilles, via Lisbon, after fleeing Paris in late May 1940. Ilya Schor and Resia Schor had two daughters, born in New York City: artist and writer Mira Schor (b. 1950) and noted literary scholar and theorist, Naomi Schor (1943–2001).

Ilya Schor, 1960, photo Ryszard Horowitz

Later life and work[edit]
In New York City, Ilya Schor began artwork that would keep fresh his memories of life of the Jews of the shtetls of Eastern Europe, working in the many materials and with the numerous skills at his disposal. He worked on major commissions for synagogues in the United States. Schor’s wood-engraving illustrations for The Earth is The Lord’s and The Sabbath, both important writings by the renowned philosopher and theologian, Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, and for Adventures of Mottel The Cantor’s Son by Sholem Aleichem, have remained in print for over fifty years. Rabbi Heschel wrote of Schor’s work, “In the stillness of the precious images Ilya Schor has called into being, generations to come will hear the voice and the spirit of eternal Israel, the inwardness and piety of our people of Eastern Europe.” Schor was also the creator of unique jewelry and small Judaica objects in silver and gold. In later years he also worked on abstract sculptures in brass and copper.
His work was exhibited at The Salpeter Gallery in New York 1953, the Museum of Contemporary Art in

Domon

Domon is a surname, belonging to several languages, and may refer to:
People[edit]

Alice Domon 1937 – Missing: 1977), French, Roman Catholic nun
Eduard Domon, former IBM researcher

Domon group, interdisciplinary research group founded by Eduard Domon

Jin Domon (born 1972), Japanese voice actor
Ken Domon (1909 – 1990), Japanese photographer

Fictional characters[edit]

Domon Kasshu, main character from the fictional anime and manga series G Gundam
Bayle Domon, character in American author Robert Jordan’s Wheel of Time series
Naoki Domon (a.k.a. BlueRacer), one of the main heroes in Gekisou Sentai Carranger

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Domon.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

중국야동

Mircea Eliade bibliography

This is a bibliography of works by Mircea Eliade.

Contents

1 Scholarly works
2 Fiction
3 Other
4 References

Scholarly works[edit]

The Comparative History of Yoga Techniques, 1933
Oceanografie, 1934
Alchimia Asiatică, 1934
Yoga: Essai sur les origines de la mystique indienne, 1936
Cosmologie şi alchimie babiloniană, 1937
Fragmentarium, 1939
Comentarii la legenda Meşterului Manole, 1943
Techniques du Yoga, 1948
Traité d’histoire des religions, 1949 – Patterns in Comparative Religion
Le Chamanisme et les techniques archaïques de l’extase, 1951 – Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy
Images et Symboles, 1952 – Images and Symbols
Forgerons et alchimistes, 1956 – The Forge and the Crucible
Cosmos and History: The Myth of the Eternal Return, translated: W.R. Trask. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1954. Originally published as Le Mythe de l’eternel retour: archétypes et répetition, 1949.
Yoga, Immortality and Freedom, translated: W.R. Trask. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1958. First published in French as Yoga: Essai sur l’origine de la mystique Indienne in 1933.
Rites and Symbols of Initiation (Birth and Rebirth), translated: W. Trask, London: Harvill Press, 1958. The publication of Eliade’s 1956 Haskell Lectures at the University of Chicago, Patterns of Initiation.
Patterns in Comparative Religion, translated: R. Sheed, London: Sheed and Ward, 1958.
The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion, translated from French: W.R. Trask, Harvest/HBJ Publishers, 1957 ISBN 0-15-679201-X.
Myths, Dreams and Mysteries: the Encounter between Contemporary Faiths and Archaic Realities, translated: P. Mairet, London: Harvill Press, 1959.
Images and Symbols: Studies in Religious Symbolism, translated: P. Mairet, London: Harvill Press, 1961.
Patanjali et Yoga, 1962 – Patanjali and Yoga
Myth and Reality, translated: W. Trask, New York: Harper and Row, 1963.
Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy, translated: W.R. Trask. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1964. Originally published Le Chamanisme, 1951.
The Two and the One, translated: J.M. Cohen, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1965.
The Quest: History and Meaning in Religion, London: University of Chicago Press, 1969.
De Zalmoxis à Gengis-Khan. Études comparatives sur les religions et le folklore de la Dacie et de l’Europe orientale, Payot, 1970
Zalmoxis, The Vanishing God, The University of Chicago Press, 1972.
Australian Religions, Cornell University Press, 1973
Occultism, W

Cliff Lee (outfielder)

Not to be confused with Cliff Lee (pitcher).

Cliff Lee

Outfielder

Born: (1896-08-04)August 4, 1896
Lexington, Nebraska

Died: August 25, 1980(1980-08-25) (aged 84)
Denver, Colorado

Batted: Right
Threw: Right

MLB debut

May 15, 1919, for the Pittsburgh Pirates

Last MLB appearance

September 8, 1926, for the Cleveland Indians

MLB statistics

Batting average
.300

Home runs
38

Runs batted in
216

Teams

Pittsburgh Pirates (1919–20)
Philadelphia Phillies (1921–24)
Cleveland Indians (1924)
Cincinnati Reds (1925–26)

Clifford Walker Lee (August 4, 1896 – August 25, 1980) was a professional baseball player. He played all or part of eight seasons in Major League Baseball, from 1919 1926, for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies, Cleveland Indians, and Cincinnati Reds. While he was primarily an outfielder, he also played quite a few games as a first baseman and catcher.
External links[edit]

Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)

This biographical article relating to an American baseball outfielder born in the 1890s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Cliff Lee (outfielder)

Not to be confused with Cliff Lee (pitcher).

Cliff Lee

Outfielder

Born: (1896-08-04)August 4, 1896
Lexington, Nebraska

Died: August 25, 1980(1980-08-25) (aged 84)
Denver, Colorado

Batted: Right
Threw: Right

MLB debut

May 15, 1919, for the Pittsburgh Pirates

Last MLB appearance

September 8, 1926, for the Cleveland Indians

MLB statistics

Batting average
.300

Home runs
38

Runs batted in
216

Teams

Pittsburgh Pirates (1919–20)
Philadelphia Phillies (1921–24)
Cleveland Indians (1924)
Cincinnati Reds (1925–26)

Clifford Walker Lee (August 4, 1896 – August 25, 1980) was a professional baseball player. He played all or part of eight seasons in Major League Baseball, from 1919 1926, for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies, Cleveland Indians, and Cincinnati Reds. While he was primarily an outfielder, he also played quite a few games as a first baseman and catcher.
External links[edit]

Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)

This biographical article relating to an American baseball outfielder born in the 1890s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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