Monthly Archives:2월 2017

Magnolia Depot (Mississippi)

Magnolia Depot (Mississippi)

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

Mississippi Landmark

Magnolia Depot, circa 1960s

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Location
101 E. Railroad Avenue
Magnolia, Mississippi

Coordinates
31°8′38″N 90°27′28″W / 31.14389°N 90.45778°W / 31.14389; -90.45778Coordinates: 31°8′38″N 90°27′28″W / 31.14389°N 90.45778°W / 31.14389; -90.45778

Area
less than one acre

Built
c. 1895

Architectural style
Queen Anne

MPS
[1]

NRHP Reference #
84000045[1]

USMS #
113-MAG-0201-NR-ML

Significant dates

Added to NRHP
October 11, 1984

Designated USMS
September 14, 2006[2]

Magnolia Depot is a historic railway station located at 101 E. Railroad Avenue, in Magnolia, Mississippi.[3] The depot was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 and was designated a Mississippi Landmark in 2006.[1][2]
Description[edit]
In 1893, a fire destroyed Magnolia’s railway depot that was constructed in 1856.[3][4] Between 1893 and 1895, the present structure was built on the same site, next to the Illinois Central Railroad.[3]
The depot is a one-story, wood-frame building with a rectangular floor plan.[1] It was designed to accommodate both freight and passengers at the turn of the 20th century, when Magnolia served as a resort destination.[2] The depot has a gable roof design with wide eaves. The track side of the building was designed with irregular placement of sash windows, a bay window, single entrance doors, and freight doors. The opposite side of the building had single entrance doors and sash windows.
Restoration[edit]
By 1982, the building was used as an antique store and no longer served as a railway station.[1] During the first decade of the 21st century, the City of Magnolia acquired the property for use as a city hall.[4] Because of the structure’s age and deterioration of the foundation, complete exterior restoration was required, but the original windows and siding were retained for historical integrity.[4] New exterior doors were installed, and the freight doors were removed and were replaced with windows. For the interior, original doors, wood flooring, and beadboard walls were retained and restored. Renovation also included new plumbing and electrical wiring.[4]
Grants for restoration were provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History and the Mississippi Department of Transportation
일본야동

Alpheus Jones House

Alpheus Jones House

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

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Location
Northeast of Raleigh on US 401, near Raleigh, North Carolina

Coordinates
35°51′50″N 78°32′50″W / 35.86389°N 78.54722°W / 35.86389; -78.54722Coordinates: 35°51′50″N 78°32′50″W / 35.86389°N 78.54722°W / 35.86389; -78.54722

Area
3 acres (1.2 ha)

Built
1847 (1847)

Architectural style
Greek Revival

NRHP Reference #
75001295[1]

Added to NRHP
July 7, 1975

Alpheus Jones House, also known as Seth Jones 1847 Restaurant, is a historic home located near Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina. It was built in 1847, and is a two-story, rectangular, vernacular Greek Revival-style frame dwelling with a hipped roof. It is sheathed in weatherboard, sits on an ashlar foundation, and has a rear extension and kitchen wing. The front facade features a reconstructed two-story double Doric order portico. The house was restored in 1968, and renovated to house a restaurant.[2]
It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.[1]
References[edit]

^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). “National Register Information System”. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
^ Robert Topkins and Mary Alice Hinson (June 1975). “Alpheus Jones House” (pdf). National Register of Historic Places – Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2015-05-01. 

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U.S. National Register of Historic Places in North Carolina

Topics

Contributing property
Keeper of the Register
Historic district
History of the National Register of Historic Places
National Park Service
Property types

Lists
by county

Alamance
Alexander
Alleghany
Anson
Ashe
Avery
Beaufort
Bertie
Bladen
Brunswick
Buncombe
Burke
Cabarrus
Caldwell
Camden
Carteret
Caswell
Catawba
Chatham
Cherokee
Chowan
Clay
Cleveland
Columbus
Craven
Cumberland
Currituck
Dare
Davidson
Davie
Duplin
Durham
Edgecombe
Forsyth
Franklin
Gaston
Gates
Graham
Granville
Greene
Guilford
Halifax
Harnett
Haywood
Henderson
Hertford
Hoke
Hyde
Iredell
Jackson
Johnston
Jones
Lee
Lenoir
Lincoln
Macon
Madison
Martin
McDowell
Mecklenburg
Mitchell
Montgomery
Moore
Nash
New Hanover
Northampton
Onslow
Orange
Pamlico
Pasquotank
Pender
Perquimans
Person
Pitt
Polk
Randolph
Richmond
Robeson
Rockingham
Rowan
Rutherford
Sampson
Scotl

Khjdabad railway station

Khjdabad railway station

Owned by
Ministry of Railways

Other information

Station code
KBW[1]

History

Previous names
Great Indian Peninsula Railway

Khjdabad railway station (Urdu: کھجدآباد ریلوے اسٹیشن ‎) is located in Pakistan.
See also[edit]

List of railway stations in Pakistan
Pakistan Railways

References[edit]

^ Official Web Site of Pakistan Railways

External links[edit]

Official Web Site of Pakistan Railways

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Railway stations in Pakistan

Railway stations by province

Balochistan

Aab-e-gum
Ahmedwal
Alam Reg
Azad
Bakhtiarabad Domki
Beleli
Bostan
Chaman
Dalbandin
Damboli
Dera Allah Yar
Dera Murad Jamali
Dingra
Dozan
Galangur
Gat
Gulistan
Hirok
Khan Muhammad Chah
Kishingi
Koh-e-Taftan
Kolpur
Kuchlak
Mach
Mangoli
Mirjaveh
Mushkaf
Nok Kundi
Nushki
Nuttall
Padag Road
Perak
Pehro Kunri
Panir
Peshi
Qilla Abdullah
Quetta
Sar-i-Ab
Sheikh Mandah
Sheikh Wasil
Sibi Junction
Spezand Junction
Shela Bagh
Tozghi
Wali Khan
Yakmach
Yaru

Tribal Areas

Shahgai
Landi Khana
Landi Kotal

Capital Territory

Islamabad
Golra Sharif Junction

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

Akora Khattak
Baldher
Burhan
Charsadda
Faqirabad
Hayat Sher Pao Shahid
Haripur Hazara
Havelian
Jamrud
Jhangira Road
Khairabad Kund
Khushhal
Kot Najib Ullah
Mardan Junction
Nasarpur
Nowshera Junction
Peshawar City
Peshawar Cantonment
Pir Piai
Pabbi
Rumian
Sanjwal
Serai Saleh
Taru Jabba

Punjab

Attock City Junction
Attock Khurd
Bahawalpur
Chiniot
Faisalabad
Gujar Khan
Gujrat
Jallo
Jhang Sadar
Khanewal Junction
Khanpur
Lahore Junction
Lahore Cantonment
Liaquat Pur
Moghalpura Junction
Mudduki
Multan Cantonment
Rahim Yar Khan
Rawalpindi
Sargodha Junction
Sialkot Junction
Tariqabad
Vehari
Wagah

Sindh

Abad
Allahdino Sand
Arian Road
Badin
Bandhi
Begmanji
Bhiria Road
Bholari
Bin Qasim
Braudabad
Bucheri
Chor
Dabheji
Daharki
Dandot
Daur
Departure Yard
Detha
Drigh Road
Gambat
Ghotki
Gosarji
Habib Kot
Hyderabad Junction
Jacobabad Junction
Jalal Marri
Jamrao Junction
Jhimpir
Jummah Goth
Jungshahi
Karachi Cantonment
Karachi City
Khairpur
Khokhrapar
Kiamari
Kotri Junction
Kot Lalloo
Lakha Road
Landhi Junction
Lundo
Machi Goth
Mando Dairo
Mahesar
Mahrabpur Junction
Malir Cantonment
Matli
Meting
Mirpur Mathelo
Mirpur Khas
Nawabshah Junction
Norai Sharif
Oderolal
Pad Idan Junction
Pano Akil
Palijani
Pir Katpar
Pithoro Junction
Rashidabad Halt
Ran Pethani
Ranipur Riyasat
Reti
Rohri Junction
Sarhad
Sangi
Sarhari
Setharja

한국야동

Chicago Hospital for Women and Children

Chicago Hospital for Women and Children, renamed Mary Thompson Hospital after its founder’s death in 1895, was established in 1865 and provided medical care to indigent women and children as well as clinical training to women doctors. It was founded by Mary Harris Thompson, who received her degree in Boston in 1863 from the New England Female Medical College, the first medical school for women.[1][2][3]
Thompson’s established the hospital because of her inability to gain a position at Chicago’s two hospitals (one of which refused admittance to women patients).[3]
The hospital treated the wives, widows, and children of Union soldiers and it was funded by donations.[3]
The hospitals objectives were:

To afford a home for women and children among the respectable poor in need of medical and surgical aid
To treat the same classes at home by an assistant physician
To afford a free dispensary for the same
To train competent nurses[2]

An affiliated nursing school was established in 1871.[4]
The hospital building was totally destroyed in the Chicago fire of 1871 and temporary accommodations were set up quickly to deal with the aftermath.[2] In 1872 with a $25,000 commitment from the Chicago Relief and Aid Society a permanent building was purchased. In 1885 a new building was erected on the site.
The hospital provided opportunities for women exclusively until 1972 when men joined the staff. Due to financial issues it closed in 1988.[3]

Contents

1 History
2 Nursing
3 Medical program
4 Organization

4.1 Hospital Staff (As of 1877)
4.2 Officers

4.2.1 Board of Trustees
4.2.2 Board of Councilors

4.3 Medical staff
4.4 Consulting staff
4.5 Dispensary physicians

5 References

History[edit]
On May 8, 1865, Mary Harris Thompson founded the Chicago Hospital for Women and Children because women were not yet permitted to be on any of Chicago’s hospital staffs. Thompson’s objective was to serve widows and orphans of Civil War soldiers who had died in battle. The hospital depended upon the aid of wealthy Chicago women and the support of several medical men. The laywomen raised funds and managed all administrative work. The medical men became consulting physicians who aided Thompson in her medical and surgical practice. These doctors provided Thompson and her institution with the stamp of medical approval required because of a widespread prejudice against women physicians.[5]
With the rapid inflow of patients and Thompson’s desire to expand women’s roles in the

Elachista turkensis

Elachista turkensis

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Arthropoda

Class:
Insecta

Order:
Lepidoptera

Family:
Elachistidae

Genus:
Elachista

Species:
E. turkensis

Binomial name

Elachista turkensis
Traugott-Olsen, 1990

Elachista turkensis is a moth in the Elachistidae family. It was described by Traugott-Olsen in 1990.[1] It is found in Turkey.
References[edit]

^ LepIndex

This article on a moth of the Elachistidae family is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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서양야동

Victor Ortiz

This article is about the American boxer and actor. For the Honduran footballer, see Víctor Ortiz. For the Puerto Rican politician, see Víctor Manuel Ortíz.

Victor Ortiz

Ortiz in 2011

Statistics

Nickname(s)
Vicious

Rated at

Light welterweight
Welterweight

Height
5 ft 9 in (175 cm)

Reach
70 in (178 cm)

Nationality
American

Born
(1987-01-31) January 31, 1987 (age 30)
Garden City, Kansas, U.S.

Stance
Southpaw

Boxing record

Total fights
39

Wins
31

Wins by KO
24

Losses
6

Draws
2

Victor Ortiz (born January 31, 1987) is an American professional boxer and film actor.[1] He held the WBC welterweight title in 2011, and was formerly rated as one of the top three welterweights in the world by most sporting news and boxing websites, including The Ring magazine,[2] BoxRec,[3] and ESPN.[4] His crowd-pleasing and aggressive fighting style also made him the 2008 ESPN Prospect of the Year.[5]
Outside of boxing, Ortiz has had roles in the films The Expendables 3 (2014) and Southpaw (2015).

Contents

1 Early life
2 Amateur career

2.1 Move to California

3 Professional career

3.1 Light Welterweight

3.1.1 Comeback

3.2 Welterweight

3.2.1 Ortiz vs. Berto I
3.2.2 Ortiz vs. Mayweather
3.2.3 Ortiz vs. Lopez
3.2.4 Ortiz vs. Collazo
3.2.5 Ortiz vs. Pérez
3.2.6 Ortiz vs. Berto II

4 Boxing style
5 Professional boxing record
6 Television

6.1 Dancing with the Stars

7 Acting career

7.1 Filmography

8 References
9 External links

Early life[edit]
Ortiz was born and raised in Garden City, Kansas, and is the third of four children of Mexican parents. When he was seven years old, Ortiz’s mother abandoned her family. Shortly thereafter, Ortiz began boxing at the insistence of his father, an alcoholic who often beat his children following his wife’s departure.[6] In an interview, Victor said, “I hated that lady. I drew her a card once with a little rose on it and I gave it to her. She just threw it down and said ‘What do I want that shit for?’ That’s when I picked up boxing. Then my Dad started screwing up, drinking.”[7]
Ortiz’ father also abandoned the family five years after their mother left, which forced Ortiz and his five siblings into the Kansas foster care system. Ortiz was twelve years old at the time.[8] His older sister became a legal adult in 2002 and moved to Denver, Colorado. Ortiz and his younger brother left Kansas and moved in with her.[9]
Amateur career[edit]
While training at a Sal
밍키넷

I Got a Name

This article is about the album. For the song, see I Got a Name (song).

I Got a Name

Studio album by Jim Croce

Released
December 1, 1973[1]

Recorded
The Hit Factory, New York City

Genre
Folk rock

Length
30:57

Label
ABC (US)
Vertigo (UK)

Producer
Terry Cashman, Tommy West

Jim Croce chronology

Life & Times
(1973)
I Got a Name
(1973)
Photographs & Memories
(1974)

Singles from I Got a Name

“I Got a Name / “Alabama Rain””
Released: September 1973
“I’ll Have to Say I Love You in a Song” / “Salon and Saloon”
Released: April 1974
“Workin’ at the Car Wash Blues” / “Thursday”
Released: June 1974

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating

AllMusic
[2]

Rolling Stone
(favorable)[3]

Robert Christgau
C+[4]

I Got a Name is the fifth and final studio album (and first posthumous release) by American singer-songwriter Jim Croce, released on December 1, 1973.[5] It features the ballad “I’ll Have to Say I Love You in a Song”, which reached number 9 in the US singles chart, and the ballad “Salon and Saloon”, the last song Croce recorded in his lifetime. The song was written by his guitarist Maury Muehleisen and was included on the album as a gift to the writer. The song is noted for its sparse piano only vocal backing. This would be Croce’s final album recorded during his lifetime, as Croce died in a plane crash shortly before the album’s title song was released, leaving wife Ingrid Croce and son Adrian J. Croce. The title track, the theme from the film The Last American Hero, was another posthumous hit for Croce, reaching number 10 in the US singles chart.

Contents

1 Track listing
2 Songwriting
3 “I Got a Name” in film and television
4 Personnel
5 Chart positions

5.1 Weekly charts
5.2 Year-end charts
5.3 Certifications

6 References

Track listing[edit]

No.
Title
Writer(s)
Length

1.
“I Got a Name”
Charles Fox, Norman Gimbel
3:09

2.
“Lover’s Cross”
Jim Croce
3:04

3.
“Five Short Minutes”
Jim Croce
3:29

4.
“Age”
Jim Croce, Ingrid Croce
3:46

5.
“Workin’ at the Car Wash Blues”
Jim Croce
2:32

6.
“I’ll Have to Say I Love You in a Song”
Jim Croce
2:34

7.
“Salon and Saloon”
Maury Muehleisen
2:31

8.
“Thursday”
Sal Joseph
2:28

9.
“Top Hat Bar and Grille”
Jim Croce
2:47

10.
“Recently”
Jim Croce
2:34

11.
“The Hard Way Every Time”
Jim Croce
2:29

Songwriting[edit]
Croce’s wife Ingrid Croce[6] has an autobiographical cookbook, Thyme In A Bottle, in which she writes interesting anecdotes ab

Lophomyrtus bullata

For the New Zealand town, see Ramarama.

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Lophomyrtus bullata

ramarama seedling

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Plantae

(unranked):
Angiosperms

(unranked):
Eudicots

(unranked):
Rosids

Order:
Myrtales

Family:
Myrtaceae

Genus:
Lophomyrtus

Species:
L. bullata

Binomial name

Lophomyrtus bullata
Burret

Ramarama seedling

Lophomyrtus bullata, also known as ramarama or bubbleleaf, is a species of evergreen myrtle shrub in the genus Lophomyrtus, family Myrtaceae. It is found in New Zealand.
L. bullata grows to a height of 8 metres, producing many branches closely packed together. The leaves are oval shaped, thick, shiny and bubbled, varying in colour from dark green to yellow green. They can also appear spotted with red, maroon, or blackish marks.
L. bullata flowers between November and March, and subsequently fruits from January through to June.[1]
References[edit]

^ “Ramarama (Lophomyrtus bullata)”. Taranaki Educational Resource: Research, Analysis and Information Network. Retrieved 3 April 2012. 

This Myrtaceae article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Taxon identifiers

EoL: 5457259
GBIF: 3188099
Plant List: kew-115182
Tropicos: 22103134
NCBI: 375237
IPNI: 597561-1
GRIN: 459677

연예인야동

Sawargaon

Sawargaon
सावरगाव
सावरगाव (गुरुवाचे)

Village

Country
 India

State
Maharashtra

District
Ahmadnagar

Government

 • Type
Panchayati raj (India)

 • Body
Gram panchayat

Languages

 • Official
Marathi

Time zone
IST (UTC+5:30)

Telephone code
022488

ISO 3166 code
IN-MH

Vehicle registration
MH-16,17

Lok Sabha constituency
Ahmednagar

Vidhan Sabha constituency
Parner

Website
maharashtra.gov.in

Sawargaonis a village in Parner taluka in Ahmednagar district of state of Maharashtra, India.[1]
Religion[edit]
The majority of the population in the village is Hindu.
See also[edit]

Parner taluka
Villages in Parner taluka

References[edit]

^ Villages in Parner taluka-Glorious India

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Parner taluka topics

Villages

Akkalwadi
Alkuti
Apadhup
Astagaon
Babhulwade
Baburdi
Bhalwani
Bhandgaon
Bhondre
Bhoyre Gangarda
Chincholi
Chombhut
Daithane Gunjal
Darodi
Desawade
Devibhoaire
Dhawalpuri
Dhoki
Dhotre Bk
Diksal
Ganji Bhoyare
Gargundi
Garkhindi
Gatewadi
Ghanegaon
Goregaon
Gunaore
Hanga
Hattalkhindi
Hiware Korda
Jadhvawadi
Jamgaon
Jategaon
Jawala
Kadus
Kakane Wadi
Kalas
Kalkup
Kanhur Pathar
Karandi
Karegaon
Karjule Harya
Kasare
Katalwedha
Khadakwadi
Kinhi
Kohkadi
Kurund
Loni Haveli
Lonimawala
Mahskewadi
Map
Mandave Kd
Mawale Wadi
Mhasane
Mungashi
Nandur Pathar
Narayan Gawhan
Nighoj
Pabal
Padali Aale
Padali Darya
Padali Kanhur
Padali Ranjangaon
Palashi
Palspur
Palwe Bk
Palwe Kd
Panoli
Parner
Patharwadi
Pimpalgaon Rotha
Pimpalgaon Turk
Pimpalner
Pimpri Gawali
Pimpri Jalsen
Pimpri Pathar
Pokhari
Punewadi
Raitale
Ralegan Siddhi
Ralegan Therpal
Randhe
Ranjangaon Mashid
Renwadi
Rui Chatrapati
Sangvi Surya
Sarola Adwai
Sawargaon
Shanjapur
Sherikasare
Shirapur
Sidheshwar Wadi
Supa
Takali Dhokeshwar
Tikhol
Vesdare
Viroli
Wadegawhan Wadgaon Amali
Wadgaon Darya
Wadgaon Savtal
Wadner Bk
Wadner Haveli
Wadule
Wadzire
Waghunde Bk
Waghunde Kd
Walwane
Wankute
Wasunde
Yadavwadi

Large Dams

Dhoki Dam
Hanga Dam
Lonimavla Dam
Mandohol Dam
Palashi Dam
Rui Chatrapati Dam
Tikhol Dam

Education Societies

Rayat Shikshan Sanstha
Shree Hareshwar Education Society
SAI Education Society

Schools

Jawahar Navodaya Vidyalaya, Ahmednagar
Shri Sainath Highschool & Jr. College
Shree Hareshwar Vidyalaya

Colleges

New Arts, Science and Commerce College, Parner
Pravra Education Socity’s Arts, Science and Commerce College, Alkuti
Shri Dho

Everything Will Be

Everything Will Be is a 2014 documentary film about the changing face of Vancouver’s Chinatown, directed by Julia Kwan and produced by David Christensen for the National Film Board of Canada. Everything Will Be was the first documentary film for Kwan, whose first feature Eve and the Fire Horse was a fictional comic account of growing up Chinese in Vancouver.[1]

Contents

1 Production
2 Release
3 References
4 External links

Production[edit]
Kwan and Christensen had initially explored the idea of making a film that contrasted Vancouver’s fading Chinatown with the thriving Golden Village in nearby Richmond, until Kwan realized her passion was in documenting Chinatown’s historic sites and businesses before they disappeared: “One day I was walking down Pender Street and within a two-block radius I counted like 20 shuttered shops … herbalists and knick-knack shops and green grocers. I think I was inspired to make this film from that ache I felt for the Chinatown of my childhood.”[2]
Kwan has described the film as “an observational, immersive documentary, inspired by Frederick Wiseman,” and prepared for the film by walking the streets of Chinatown with her cinematographer. Since she characterizes her own command of Cantonese as “highly suspect,” Kwan had a researcher and translator with her much of the time. She found herself drawn to the stories of elderly residents, who reminded her of her own parents and the people she grew up with.[1]
Area residents featured in Everything Will Be include an elderly newspaper seller known as Granny Kwan, and a security guard who’s worked in the area for 20 years, who helped the filmmaker convince doubtful area residents to participate in the film. The film’s title is inspired by a neon installation by Martin Creed, which reads “Everything Is Going To Be Alright,” overlooking the neighbourhood from atop real estate developer Bob Rennie’s art museum in Chinatown’s Wing Sang building. Rennie is also featured in the film.[1][2][3]
Release[edit]
The film premiered at the 2014 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival,[4] followed by the Vancouver International Film Festival.[1][3]
References[edit]

^ a b c d Eisner, Ken (24 September 2014). “VIFF 2014: Julia Kwan’s Everything Will Be captures Vancouver’s Chinatown in transition”. Georgia Straight. Retrieved 11 February 2015. 
^ a b Leirin-Young, Mark (24 September 2014). “VIFF: Julia Kwan rediscovers Chinatown in debut documentary”. Vancouver

Everything Will Be

Everything Will Be is a 2014 documentary film about the changing face of Vancouver’s Chinatown, directed by Julia Kwan and produced by David Christensen for the National Film Board of Canada. Everything Will Be was the first documentary film for Kwan, whose first feature Eve and the Fire Horse was a fictional comic account of growing up Chinese in Vancouver.[1]

Contents

1 Production
2 Release
3 References
4 External links

Production[edit]
Kwan and Christensen had initially explored the idea of making a film that contrasted Vancouver’s fading Chinatown with the thriving Golden Village in nearby Richmond, until Kwan realized her passion was in documenting Chinatown’s historic sites and businesses before they disappeared: “One day I was walking down Pender Street and within a two-block radius I counted like 20 shuttered shops … herbalists and knick-knack shops and green grocers. I think I was inspired to make this film from that ache I felt for the Chinatown of my childhood.”[2]
Kwan has described the film as “an observational, immersive documentary, inspired by Frederick Wiseman,” and prepared for the film by walking the streets of Chinatown with her cinematographer. Since she characterizes her own command of Cantonese as “highly suspect,” Kwan had a researcher and translator with her much of the time. She found herself drawn to the stories of elderly residents, who reminded her of her own parents and the people she grew up with.[1]
Area residents featured in Everything Will Be include an elderly newspaper seller known as Granny Kwan, and a security guard who’s worked in the area for 20 years, who helped the filmmaker convince doubtful area residents to participate in the film. The film’s title is inspired by a neon installation by Martin Creed, which reads “Everything Is Going To Be Alright,” overlooking the neighbourhood from atop real estate developer Bob Rennie’s art museum in Chinatown’s Wing Sang building. Rennie is also featured in the film.[1][2][3]
Release[edit]
The film premiered at the 2014 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival,[4] followed by the Vancouver International Film Festival.[1][3]
References[edit]

^ a b c d Eisner, Ken (24 September 2014). “VIFF 2014: Julia Kwan’s Everything Will Be captures Vancouver’s Chinatown in transition”. Georgia Straight. Retrieved 11 February 2015. 
^ a b Leirin-Young, Mark (24 September 2014). “VIFF: Julia Kwan rediscovers Chinatown in debut documentary”. Vancouver