Jacksonville Armada U-23

Jacksonville Armada U-23

Full name
Jacksonville Armada U-23

Founded
2010

Stadium
Patton Park
Jacksonville, Florida

Ground Capacity
1,000

Head Coach
Pat Cannon

League
National Premier Soccer League

Website
Club home page

Home colors

Away colors

Current season

Jacksonville Armada U-23 are an American soccer team based in Jacksonville, Florida. They play in National Premier Soccer League (NPSL), the fourth tier of the American soccer pyramid, and are part of the development system of the Jacksonville Armada FC of the North American Soccer League (NASL). They started play in 2016, replacing Jacksonville United FC in the NPSL. The team plays its home games at Patton Park in Jacksonville.
As Jacksonville United, the club won the NPSL Championship in its first year in the 2011 season.

Contents

1 History
2 Players
3 Year-by-year
4 Honors
5 Head coaches
6 References
7 External links

History[edit]
Jacksonville United FC was founded in 2010 in Jacksonville, Florida, and began play in the 2011 season of the National Premier Soccer League (NPSL), considered at the fourth tier of the American soccer pyramid. The team was owned by Barry Dixon. While the team started their first season with four straight losses, they finished the season on an 8-game winning streak through the playoffs, finally defeating the Hollywood United Hitmen to claim the NPSL Championship with a 3-2 victory on July 30, 2011 in Madison, Alabama. Tommy Krizanovic was named Jacksonville’s MVP, scoring a hat-trick in the final.[1]
In 2016, Jacksonville Armada FC of the North American Soccer League (NASL) announced they would establish an under 23 team to compete in the NPSL as part of the club’s development system. Jacksonville Armada U-23 replaced Jacksonville United in the league for the 2016 NPSL season. The Armada retained head coach Pat Cannon.[2]
Players[edit]
Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No.

Position
Player

No.

Position
Player

Year-by-year[edit]

Year
Division
League
Regular Season
Playoffs
Open Cup

2011
4
NPSL
1st, Southeast
Champions
Not eligible

2012
4
NPSL
4th, South-Southeast-East
Did not qualify
2nd round

2013
4
NPSL
1st, Sunshine
Regional Semi-Final
Did not qualify

2014
4
NPSL
2nd, Sunshine
“Conference Semi-Final”
2nd round

Honors[edit]

NPSL Southern Region Semi-Finalist 2013
NPSL Sun
연예인야동

9½ Weeks (book)

9½ Weeks is a 1978 semi-autobiographical erotic novel by the Austrian-American author Ingeborg Day, under the pseudonym Elizabeth McNeill.[1][2]
It was made into the film 9½ Weeks starring Kim Basinger and Mickey Rourke in 1986.
References[edit]

^ Weinman, Sarah (2012-11-30). “Who Was the Real Woman Behind “Nine and a Half Weeks”?”. The New Yorker. Retrieved 2017-01-02. 
^ Helen, O’Hara (November 30, 2012). “9 ½ Weeks: the story of the original 50 Shades of Grey”. Telegraph.co.uk. Retrieved 2017-01-02. 

This article about an erotic novel of the 1970s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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See guidelines for writing about novels. Further suggestions might be found on the article’s talk page.

한국야동

Socialist Party of Canada (WSM)

Not to be confused with Socialist Party of Canada.

Socialist Party of Canada

Leader
none/membership conference

Founded
1931 (1931)

Preceded by
Socialist Party of Canada

Headquarters
Victoria, BC

Newspaper
Western Socialist (1933-1980), Socialist Fulcrum (1968-1984), Socialisme Mondial (1973-1980), Imagine (2002-)

Ideology
Impossibilism
Socialism
Classical Marxism
Anti-Leninism

International affiliation
World Socialist Movement

Colours
Red

Website

www.worldsocialism.org/canada/ http://www.canadiansocialistparty.com/

Politics of Canada
Political parties
Elections

The Socialist Party of Canada (SPC) was founded in June 1931 in Winnipeg, Manitoba by several former members of the Socialist Party of Canada. These included George Armstrong and Jim Milne, author of a history of the party and its predecessor. While Jim Brownrigg claimed continuity with the original party, this claim was disputed by various members of both the original party and the new party (Harry Morrison, Isaac Rab, Jack McDonald, Bill Pritchard, R. M. Roddy) . The new party adopted the policies of the Socialist Party of Great Britain which rejected Leninism, social democracy and trade unionism in favour of a belief in “revolutionary Marxism and democratic revolution”.

Contents

1 History

1.1 World War II

2 Election results by year

2.1 General elections
2.2 By-election May 29, 1961

3 Present activity
4 Publications
5 See also
6 References
7 External links

History[edit]

Part of a series on

Socialism

Development

History of socialism
Socialist calculation debate
Socialist economics

Ideas

Calculation in kind
Collective ownership
Cooperative
Common ownership
Economic democracy
Economic planning
Equal opportunity
Free association
Industrial democracy
Input–output model
Internationalism
Labour voucher
Material balance planning
Peer‑to‑peer economics
(Sharing economy)
Production for use
Social dividend
Social ownership
Socialism in One Country
Socialist mode of production
State ownership

To each according
to his contribution

Workplace democracy
Workers’ self-management

Models

Decentralized planning
Participatory economics

Market socialism

Economic democracy
Georgism

Lange model
Mutualism
Ricardian socialism

Planned economy
Soviet-type
Project Cybersyn

Socialist market economy
Socialist-oriented market

Variants

African
Arab
Agrarian
Anarchist
Anarcho-communism
Anarcho-syndicali

Alex Wright (author)

Alex Wright is an American writer and Information Architect. He is the author of two books: Cataloging the World: Paul Otlet and the Birth of the Information Age (2014) and Glut: Mastering Information Through the Ages (2007). Wright is also a professor at the School of Visual Arts in New York City and head of User Experience research at Etsy.[1] Many of his writings examine the current state of information transmission and organization through a historical, scientific, or cultural context.[2][3]

Contents

1 Biography
2 Bibliography
3 References
4 External links

Biography[edit]
Wright grew up in Richmond, Virginia and Sussex, England. In high school, he has been described as “A long-haired nerd who spent lots of time in the computer lab but somehow never managed to get much past Basic.”[2] He has a B.A. in English Literature from Brown University and a graduate degree in Library and Information Science from Simmons College. Throughout his career, he has been a frequent contributor to The New York Times. Wright currently resides in Brooklyn, New York with his wife and two sons.[4]
Bibliography[edit]

Wright, Alex (2007). Glut:Mastering Information Through the Ages. National Academies Press. ISBN 978-0801475092. 
Wright, Alex (2014). Cataloging the World:Paul Otlet and the Birth of the Information Age. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199354207. 

References[edit]

^ “SVA Interaction Design Faculty”. SVA NYC. Retrieved 2 April 2016. 
^ a b Gary Anthes. “Q&A with Alex Wright”. Computerworld. Retrieved 2 April 2016. 
^ “Paul Otlet, Google, Wikipedia, and cataloging the world”. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 2 April 2016. 
^ “About Alex Wright”. Retrieved 2 April 2016. 

External links[edit]

인천오피

Fuck It (I Don’t Want You Back)

“Fuck It (I Don’t Want You Back)”

Single by Eamon

from the album I Don’t Want You Back

Released
November 13, 2003 (2003-11-13)

Format
CD single

Recorded
2003

Genre
R&B

Length
3:45

Label
Jive

Writer(s)
Eamon Doyle, Kirk Robinson, Mark Passy

Eamon singles chronology

“Fuck It (I Don’t Want You Back)”
(2003)
“I Love Them Ho’s (Ho-Wop)”
(2004)

Music video

“Fuck It (I Don’t Want You Back)” on YouTube

“Fuck It (I Don’t Want You Back)” is the debut single by American singer-songwriter/harmonicist Eamon. It was co-written by Eamon, Kirk Robinson and Mark Passy. It was released on November 23, 2003 as the lead single from his debut album, I Don’t Want You Back.
The song is notable for the frequency of its expletives. It also reached number one in many countries, including Australia, Denmark, Italy, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. It appeared in Billboard magazine as “F**k It (I Don’t Want You Back)”.

Contents

1 History
2 Music video
3 Track listing

3.1 Single version
3.2 EP version
3.3 iTunes Album version

4 Charts

4.1 Weekly charts
4.2 Year-end charts
4.3 Decade-end charts

5 References

History[edit]
The success of the single and the controversial nature of its lyrics prompted production of an answer song, “F.U.R.B. (Fuck You Right Back)”, by female singer Frankee, who claimed to be Eamon’s ex-girlfriend. While Eamon initially said that he selected Frankee to record the song at an audition, he later stated that his only involvement was in clearing the use of the music with the following statement:
“I was not involved with ‘F.U.R.B.’ I have never met Frankee and she is definitely not my girlfriend or ex-girlfriend. The only way I was associated with it was when I was asked for licensing permission by Frankee’s representatives, which makes me a writer on her song by copyright law. But I really didn’t expect all this to come out of it, they are having fun with it, it’s cool but in the end they are paying me for their 15 minutes of fame and I welcome her to my world of Ho-Wop!”[1]
BBC Radio 1 presenter Chris Moyles was heavily critical of both songs, going as far as to record and broadcast his own spoof version; “We Want You to Leave”, claiming that both singles were the product of what amounted to nothing more than a cynical marketing ploy by Eamon and Frankee’s record labels.
The song was included on the Australian compilation CD So Fresh: The Hits of Winter 2004, part of a seas
강남오피

Guptāsana

Guptasana, also known as Siddhasana is an Asana. It is translated as Hidden Pose from Sanskrit.
The name of this pose comes from “gupta” meaning “hidden”, and “asana” meaning “posture” or “seat”.[1][2][3]
Benefits and Cautions[edit]
Benefits of this pose include opening the hips, and helps stabilize the back and abdominal muscles.
Be careful while doing this pose if you have hip, knee or ankle injuries.[4][5][6]
Publications Featuring Guptasana[edit]

Asanas 608: Yoga Poses by Dharma Mittra [7]
Yoga Resource Practice Manual by Darren Rhodes [8]
Yoga (Yoga Journal Books) by Linda Sparrowe and David Martinez [9]
2,100 Asanas: The Complete Yoga Poses by Mr. Yoga (Daniel Lacerda) [10]
Yoga From the Heart by Yogananth Andiappan [11]

References[edit]

^ “Guptasana”. Retrieved 19 June 2016. 
^ “Guptasana (Hidden Pose) – How to do and Benefits”. Styles At Life. 2015-11-02. Retrieved 2016-06-19. 
^ Singh, Suraj. “Guptasana (Hidden Posture) – Not for women”. Yoga Exercise | Yoga Poses. Retrieved 2016-06-19. 
^ “Accomplished Pose (Siddhasana) | Steps, Precautions And Health Benefits Of Accomplished Pose”. www.yogawiz.com. Retrieved 2016-06-19. 
^ “Guptasana (Hidden Pose) – How to do and Benefits”. Styles At Life. 2015-11-02. Retrieved 2016-06-19. 
^ yoga365fitness (2014-06-30). “Siddhasana (Guptasana) : This can also help improve sexual disorders, cardiac function and blood pressure. Additionally, the pose is beneficial for those who suffer from health conditions like piles and hemorrhoids.”. Yoga365Fitness.com. Retrieved 2016-06-19. 
^ Mittra, Dharma (2003-04-01). Asanas: 608 Yoga Poses. Novato, Calif.: New World Library. ISBN 9781577314028. 
^ Rhodes, Darren; Sell, Christina; Longstaff, Michael (2013-02-10). Huang, Ellen, ed. Yoga Resource Practice Manual. Tirtha Studios & Yo Productions. 
^ Sparrowe, Linda; Martinez, David (2008-01-08). Yoga. New York: Universe. ISBN 9780789399878. 
^ Lacerda, Daniel (2015-11-10). 2,100 Asanas: The Complete Yoga Poses. Black Dog & Leventhal. ISBN 9781631910104. 
^ Andiappan, Yogananth (2007-01-01). Yogananth Andiappan – Yoga From the Heart. International Yoga Academy Lim. ISBN 9789889982812. 

조개넷

Bayesian econometrics

This article includes a list of references, but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (July 2012) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Bayesian econometrics is a branch of econometrics which applies Bayesian principles to economic modelling. Bayesianism is based on a degree-of-belief interpretation of probability, as opposed to a relative-frequency interpretation.
The Bayesian principle relies on Bayes’ theorem which states that the probability of B conditional on A is the ratio of joint probability of A and B divided by probability of B. Bayesian econometricians assume that coefficients in the model have prior distributions.
This approach was first propagated by Arnold Zellner.[1]

Contents

1 Basics
2 History
3 Current research topics
4 References

Basics[edit]
Main article: Bayesian inference
Subjective probabilities have to satisfy the standard axioms of probability theory if one wishes to avoid losing a bet regardless of the outcome.[2] Before the data is observed, the parameter

θ

{\displaystyle \theta }

is regarded as an unknown quantity and thus random variable, which is assigned a prior distribution

π
(
θ
)

{\displaystyle \pi (\theta )}

with

0

θ

1

{\displaystyle 0\leq \theta \leq 1}

. Bayesian analysis concentrates on the inference of the posterior distribution

π
(
θ

|

y
)

{\displaystyle \pi (\theta |y)}

, i.e. the distribution of the random variable

θ

{\displaystyle \theta }

conditional on the observation of the discrete data

y

{\displaystyle y}

. The posterior density function

π
(
θ

|

y
)

{\displaystyle \pi (\theta |y)}

can be computed based on Bayes’ Theorem:

p
(
θ

|

y
)
=

p
(
y

Cypress Creek High School (Orlando, Florida)

Cypress Creek High School

Location

Orlando (Orange County), Florida
U.S.

Information

Type
Public Secondary

Established
1992

School district
Orange County Public Schools

Principal
Dr. W. John McHale

Grades
9–12

Enrollment
3,302

Color(s)
Maroon, Silver, Black, and White

Mascot
Bear

Rival
Pikete

National ranking
1651

Motto
To lead our students to success with the support and involvement of families and the community. To be the top producer of successful students in the nation.

Website
CCHS

Cypress Creek High School is located in south Orlando, Florida and serves students in grades 9 through 12.
Cypress Creek is an IB World School with an International Baccalaureate Diploma Program.[1] As an IB World School, CCHS is a local magnet school allowing students from other Orange County, Florida schools to attend.[2]
Cypress Creek High School receives graduating students from Meadow Woods Middle School, South Creek Middle School and Walker Middle School. However,,, it is a magnet school, so students from surrounding middle schools (e.g. Hunters Creek Middle School, Freedom Middle School, Westridge Middle School, Lake Nona Middle School, Southwest Middle School) also attend Cypress Creek albeit in smaller numbers.

Contents

1 Band
2 IB Diploma Program
3 Notable people
4 References
5 External links

Band[edit]

The CCHS Marching Band at the Bands of America Orlando Regional in October 2000.

The Cypress Creek Marching Band is a seven-time Florida Marching Band Coalition Class 4A Champion (in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2007, and 2010) and was named Grand Champion an unprecedented five times (1998–2002) before FMBC eliminated the Grand Champion title (now only class champions are named)[3] The marching band was a Bands of America Grand Nationals Semi-Finalist two times, in 2000 and 2002, finishing in the top 20.
The Cypress Creek Wind Ensemble has been guest-conducted by composers including Karel Husa (in 1996) and David Holsinger (in 2002). The group has performed at venues and festivals including Bands of America Marching and Concert Festivals in 1997 and 2000, and Carnegie Hall in April 2009. The Wind Ensemble also recently performed for the second time at the Music for All National Concert Band Festival in Indianapolis, Indiana.[4]
The Cypress Creek High School Winter Guard has competed in the Dayton, Ohio WGI World Championships since 1999. They have been finalists in the WGI competitions seven times since the sc

Slidre

Road past Slidredomen

Slidre is the administrative centre of Vestre Slidre municipality, Norway. [1]
Slidre (with its surrounding areas) was established as a municipality January 1, 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt). It was divided into Vestre Slidre and Øystre Slidre in 1849. It is located by the Slidrefjord. Its population (SSB 2005) is 293. Slidre is the site of the medieval era, stone church Slidredomen (Slidre kyrkje). [2]
References[edit]

^ “Slidre – tettsted”. Store norske leksikon. Retrieved October 1, 2016. 
^ Sigrid Christie, Ola Storsletten, Anne Marta Hoff. “Slidre kirke”. Norges Kirker. Retrieved October 1, 2016.  CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)

Coordinates: 61°5′17″N 8°58′48″E / 61.08806°N 8.98000°E / 61.08806; 8.98000

This Oppland location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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일산오피

Jane Octavia Brookfield

Jane Octavia Brookfield

Portrait of Brookfield in 1859 by Charles Albert Ludovici

Born
Jane Octavia Elton
(1821-03-25)25 March 1821
Clifton, Nr. Bristol

Died
27 November 1896(1896-11-27) (aged 75)
Chelsea, London

Nationality
British

Occupation
Author

Spouse(s)
William Henry Brookfield

Children
Arthur Montagu Brookfield (1853–1940) and Charles Hallam Elton Brookfield (1857–1913)

Parents

Charles Abraham Elton (father)
Sarah Smith (mother)

Jane Octavia Brookfield (25 March 1821 – 27 November 1896) was a literary hostess and writer, best known for her platonic friendship with William Makepeace Thackeray, and the four indifferent novels she wrote.

Contents

1 Biography
2 Family
3 Works
4 Notes
5 References

Biography[edit]
Brookfield was born on 25 March 1821, the youngest daughter of Sir Charles Abraham Elton, a former soldier. She lived with her seven sisters and five brothers, along with her father and mother Sarah in Clevedon Court, near Bristol. Sir Charles was a published author, writing a elegy about two of his sons who had drowned in the Bristol Channel, and was friends with both Charles Lamb and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.[1]
In 1837, the family moved to Southampton, and due to Jane’s height her father nicknamed her “Glumdalclitch”. In 1838 she was courted by and became engaged to William Henry Brookfield, the priest at the local church, twelve years her senior. After he found a better job, as curate of St James’s Church, Piccadilly, the couple married on 18 November 1841.[1]
Jane maintained an influential literary salon, which included among others Thackeray and her husband’s old college friend Alfred Tennyson. It was her close friendship with Thackeray for which she is best remembered and in the mid-1840s they were on intimate terms. D. J. Taylor in her biography in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography states “the relationship between him and Jane was almost certainly not sexual (there may have been a chaste embrace or two …)”.[1] Thackeray incorporated some of her characteristics in to two of his characters: Amelia Sedley in Vanity Fair (1848), and Laura Bell in Pendennis (1850).[1]
Family[edit]
The couple were survived by their two sons Arthur Montagu Brookfield (1853–1940) who became a British army officer, diplomat author and Conservative politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1885 to 1903; and Charles Hallam Elton Brookfield (1857–1913) an actor.[1]
Works[edit]

Influence. A Novel.

강남오피

Jane Octavia Brookfield

Jane Octavia Brookfield

Portrait of Brookfield in 1859 by Charles Albert Ludovici

Born
Jane Octavia Elton
(1821-03-25)25 March 1821
Clifton, Nr. Bristol

Died
27 November 1896(1896-11-27) (aged 75)
Chelsea, London

Nationality
British

Occupation
Author

Spouse(s)
William Henry Brookfield

Children
Arthur Montagu Brookfield (1853–1940) and Charles Hallam Elton Brookfield (1857–1913)

Parents

Charles Abraham Elton (father)
Sarah Smith (mother)

Jane Octavia Brookfield (25 March 1821 – 27 November 1896) was a literary hostess and writer, best known for her platonic friendship with William Makepeace Thackeray, and the four indifferent novels she wrote.

Contents

1 Biography
2 Family
3 Works
4 Notes
5 References

Biography[edit]
Brookfield was born on 25 March 1821, the youngest daughter of Sir Charles Abraham Elton, a former soldier. She lived with her seven sisters and five brothers, along with her father and mother Sarah in Clevedon Court, near Bristol. Sir Charles was a published author, writing a elegy about two of his sons who had drowned in the Bristol Channel, and was friends with both Charles Lamb and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.[1]
In 1837, the family moved to Southampton, and due to Jane’s height her father nicknamed her “Glumdalclitch”. In 1838 she was courted by and became engaged to William Henry Brookfield, the priest at the local church, twelve years her senior. After he found a better job, as curate of St James’s Church, Piccadilly, the couple married on 18 November 1841.[1]
Jane maintained an influential literary salon, which included among others Thackeray and her husband’s old college friend Alfred Tennyson. It was her close friendship with Thackeray for which she is best remembered and in the mid-1840s they were on intimate terms. D. J. Taylor in her biography in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography states “the relationship between him and Jane was almost certainly not sexual (there may have been a chaste embrace or two …)”.[1] Thackeray incorporated some of her characteristics in to two of his characters: Amelia Sedley in Vanity Fair (1848), and Laura Bell in Pendennis (1850).[1]
Family[edit]
The couple were survived by their two sons Arthur Montagu Brookfield (1853–1940) who became a British army officer, diplomat author and Conservative politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1885 to 1903; and Charles Hallam Elton Brookfield (1857–1913) an actor.[1]
Works[edit]

Influence. A Novel.

강남오피