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Magnolia Depot (Mississippi)

Magnolia Depot (Mississippi)

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

Mississippi Landmark

Magnolia Depot, circa 1960s

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Location
101 E. Railroad Avenue
Magnolia, Mississippi

Coordinates
31°8′38″N 90°27′28″W / 31.14389°N 90.45778°W / 31.14389; -90.45778Coordinates: 31°8′38″N 90°27′28″W / 31.14389°N 90.45778°W / 31.14389; -90.45778

Area
less than one acre

Built
c. 1895

Architectural style
Queen Anne

MPS
[1]

NRHP Reference #
84000045[1]

USMS #
113-MAG-0201-NR-ML

Significant dates

Added to NRHP
October 11, 1984

Designated USMS
September 14, 2006[2]

Magnolia Depot is a historic railway station located at 101 E. Railroad Avenue, in Magnolia, Mississippi.[3] The depot was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984 and was designated a Mississippi Landmark in 2006.[1][2]
Description[edit]
In 1893, a fire destroyed Magnolia’s railway depot that was constructed in 1856.[3][4] Between 1893 and 1895, the present structure was built on the same site, next to the Illinois Central Railroad.[3]
The depot is a one-story, wood-frame building with a rectangular floor plan.[1] It was designed to accommodate both freight and passengers at the turn of the 20th century, when Magnolia served as a resort destination.[2] The depot has a gable roof design with wide eaves. The track side of the building was designed with irregular placement of sash windows, a bay window, single entrance doors, and freight doors. The opposite side of the building had single entrance doors and sash windows.
Restoration[edit]
By 1982, the building was used as an antique store and no longer served as a railway station.[1] During the first decade of the 21st century, the City of Magnolia acquired the property for use as a city hall.[4] Because of the structure’s age and deterioration of the foundation, complete exterior restoration was required, but the original windows and siding were retained for historical integrity.[4] New exterior doors were installed, and the freight doors were removed and were replaced with windows. For the interior, original doors, wood flooring, and beadboard walls were retained and restored. Renovation also included new plumbing and electrical wiring.[4]
Grants for restoration were provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History and the Mississippi Department of Transportation
일본야동

Khjdabad railway station

Khjdabad railway station

Owned by
Ministry of Railways

Other information

Station code
KBW[1]

History

Previous names
Great Indian Peninsula Railway

Khjdabad railway station (Urdu: کھجدآباد ریلوے اسٹیشن ‎) is located in Pakistan.
See also[edit]

List of railway stations in Pakistan
Pakistan Railways

References[edit]

^ Official Web Site of Pakistan Railways

External links[edit]

Official Web Site of Pakistan Railways

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Railway stations in Pakistan

Railway stations by province

Balochistan

Aab-e-gum
Ahmedwal
Alam Reg
Azad
Bakhtiarabad Domki
Beleli
Bostan
Chaman
Dalbandin
Damboli
Dera Allah Yar
Dera Murad Jamali
Dingra
Dozan
Galangur
Gat
Gulistan
Hirok
Khan Muhammad Chah
Kishingi
Koh-e-Taftan
Kolpur
Kuchlak
Mach
Mangoli
Mirjaveh
Mushkaf
Nok Kundi
Nushki
Nuttall
Padag Road
Perak
Pehro Kunri
Panir
Peshi
Qilla Abdullah
Quetta
Sar-i-Ab
Sheikh Mandah
Sheikh Wasil
Sibi Junction
Spezand Junction
Shela Bagh
Tozghi
Wali Khan
Yakmach
Yaru

Tribal Areas

Shahgai
Landi Khana
Landi Kotal

Capital Territory

Islamabad
Golra Sharif Junction

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

Akora Khattak
Baldher
Burhan
Charsadda
Faqirabad
Hayat Sher Pao Shahid
Haripur Hazara
Havelian
Jamrud
Jhangira Road
Khairabad Kund
Khushhal
Kot Najib Ullah
Mardan Junction
Nasarpur
Nowshera Junction
Peshawar City
Peshawar Cantonment
Pir Piai
Pabbi
Rumian
Sanjwal
Serai Saleh
Taru Jabba

Punjab

Attock City Junction
Attock Khurd
Bahawalpur
Chiniot
Faisalabad
Gujar Khan
Gujrat
Jallo
Jhang Sadar
Khanewal Junction
Khanpur
Lahore Junction
Lahore Cantonment
Liaquat Pur
Moghalpura Junction
Mudduki
Multan Cantonment
Rahim Yar Khan
Rawalpindi
Sargodha Junction
Sialkot Junction
Tariqabad
Vehari
Wagah

Sindh

Abad
Allahdino Sand
Arian Road
Badin
Bandhi
Begmanji
Bhiria Road
Bholari
Bin Qasim
Braudabad
Bucheri
Chor
Dabheji
Daharki
Dandot
Daur
Departure Yard
Detha
Drigh Road
Gambat
Ghotki
Gosarji
Habib Kot
Hyderabad Junction
Jacobabad Junction
Jalal Marri
Jamrao Junction
Jhimpir
Jummah Goth
Jungshahi
Karachi Cantonment
Karachi City
Khairpur
Khokhrapar
Kiamari
Kotri Junction
Kot Lalloo
Lakha Road
Landhi Junction
Lundo
Machi Goth
Mando Dairo
Mahesar
Mahrabpur Junction
Malir Cantonment
Matli
Meting
Mirpur Mathelo
Mirpur Khas
Nawabshah Junction
Norai Sharif
Oderolal
Pad Idan Junction
Pano Akil
Palijani
Pir Katpar
Pithoro Junction
Rashidabad Halt
Ran Pethani
Ranipur Riyasat
Reti
Rohri Junction
Sarhad
Sangi
Sarhari
Setharja

한국야동

Lophomyrtus bullata

For the New Zealand town, see Ramarama.

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Lophomyrtus bullata

ramarama seedling

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Plantae

(unranked):
Angiosperms

(unranked):
Eudicots

(unranked):
Rosids

Order:
Myrtales

Family:
Myrtaceae

Genus:
Lophomyrtus

Species:
L. bullata

Binomial name

Lophomyrtus bullata
Burret

Ramarama seedling

Lophomyrtus bullata, also known as ramarama or bubbleleaf, is a species of evergreen myrtle shrub in the genus Lophomyrtus, family Myrtaceae. It is found in New Zealand.
L. bullata grows to a height of 8 metres, producing many branches closely packed together. The leaves are oval shaped, thick, shiny and bubbled, varying in colour from dark green to yellow green. They can also appear spotted with red, maroon, or blackish marks.
L. bullata flowers between November and March, and subsequently fruits from January through to June.[1]
References[edit]

^ “Ramarama (Lophomyrtus bullata)”. Taranaki Educational Resource: Research, Analysis and Information Network. Retrieved 3 April 2012. 

This Myrtaceae article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Taxon identifiers

EoL: 5457259
GBIF: 3188099
Plant List: kew-115182
Tropicos: 22103134
NCBI: 375237
IPNI: 597561-1
GRIN: 459677

연예인야동

Invincible Ed

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

The topic of this article may not meet Wikipedia’s general notability guideline. Please help to establish notability by citing reliable secondary sources that are independent of the topic and provide significant coverage of it beyond its mere trivial mention. If notability cannot be established, the article is likely to be merged, redirected, or deleted.
Find sources: ”Invincible Ed” – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR · free images (February 2009) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

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The Invincible Ed (Hardcover, June 2004)

Invincible Ed is the debut graphic novel written and illustrated by Ryan Woodward who has worked on such film projects as Space Jam, The Iron Giant, Osmosis Jones, and Spider-Man 2. Invincible Ed was originally released by Summertime Books, Woodward’s own publishing company. The entire four issue miniseries was released later by Dark Horse Comics in 2004.
Plot summary[edit]
When the Council of Galaxies decides that earth is on the path of self-destruction it acts by sending an alien sociologist named Nod. Nod is commanded to go to planet Earth to choose a worthy human to receive the power of “the right”. Nod tries to explain to the council that he cannot tell whether someone is worthy to receive “the right” or not. Nonetheless, the council sends him to earth with a green orb that delivers the power of “the right” to the first human to look into it.
Nod picks a football playing bully named Lance Lundgrin from Chesterton High to become Earth’s champion. Having accidentally blown Lance’s bookbag up in Science class earlier in the day, Ed reluctantly meets him in the locker room after school for what he assumes will be a severe beating. Lance decides not to beat Ed to a pulp but does decide to make him spend the night in his locker. As Lance opens the locker, both he and Ed look at the orb that was placed there by Nod at the same time. We see Nod say that the orb isn’t intended for more than one person. Th

Himilco

For other people named Himilco, see Himilco (disambiguation).
Himilco (Phoenician Chimilkât),[1] a Carthaginian navigator and explorer, lived during the height of Carthaginian power, the 5th century BC.
Himilco is the first known explorer from the Mediterranean Sea to reach the northwestern shores of Europe. His lost account of his adventures is quoted by Roman writers. The oldest reference to Himilco’s voyage is a brief mention in Natural History (2.169a) by the Roman scholar Pliny the Elder.[2] Himilco was quoted three times by Rufus Festus Avienus, who wrote Ora Maritima, a poetical account of the geography in the 4th century AD.[3]
We know next to nothing of Himilco himself. Himilco sailed north along the Atlantic coast of present-day Spain, Portugal, England[4] and France. He reached northwestern France, as well as the territory of the Oestrimini tribe living in Portugal probably to trade for tin to be used for making bronze and for other precious metals. Records of the voyages of the Carthaginian Himilco take note of the islands of Albion and Ierne. Avienus asserts that the outward journey to the Oestriminis took the Carthaginians four months.[1] Himilco was not (according to Avienus) the first to sail the northern Atlantic Ocean; according to Avienus, Himilco followed the trade route used by the Tartessians of southern Iberia.[citation needed]
Himilco described his journeys as quite harrowing, repeatedly reporting sea monsters and seaweed,[5] likely in order to deter Greek rivals from competing on their new trade routes. Carthaginian accounts of monsters became one source of the myths discouraging sailing in the Atlantic.[6]
See also[edit]

Avienus
Periplus of Hanno
Periplus

References[edit]

^ a b Himilco
^ Pliny the Elder, Natural History 2.169a
^ Avienus, Rufius Festus and Murphy, J. P. (1977) Ora maritima: or, description of the seacoast from Brittany round to Massilia. Ares Publisher, ISBN 0-89005-175-5
^ http://britannia.com/celtic/scotland/timeline/index.html
^ Avienus, V. 113-128
^ Roller, Duane W. (2006). Through the pillars of Herakles: Greco-Roman exploration of the Atlantic. Taylor & Francis, pp. 27-28. ISBN 0-415-37287-9

“Himilco in “Livius Articles on ancient history””. Himilco by Jona Lendering. Retrieved 7 April 2009. 

External links[edit]

Rufus Festus Avienus ora maritima in Latin

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Notable Carthaginians

Adherbal (admiral)
Adherbal (governor of Gades)
Carthalo
Dido
Hamilcar (Drepanum)
Hamilc

Ray Stata

Raymond Stuart Stata (born 1934) is an American engineer and investor.

Contents

1 Biography

1.1 Family and schooling
1.2 Philanthropy
1.3 Honors[3]

2 Publications

2.1 Publications by Ray Stata
2.2 Interviews with Ray

3 References

Biography[edit]
Family and schooling[edit]
Raymond Stuart Stata was born on November 12, 1934 in the small farming community of Oxford, Pennsylvania to Rhoda Pearl Buchanan and Raymond Stanford Stata, a self-employed electrical contractor. In high school, Ray worked as an apprentice for his father. Ray’s mother was a factory worker. Ray’s sister, Joan Stata, was five years older and worked as a nurse in Wilmington, Delaware.[1] In the first grade, Stata attended a one-room school with one teacher serving eight grades. Then, his parents moved to the outskirts of Baltimore to work at an aircraft factory during WWII. [1] Ray attended Oxford High School in Oxford, Pennsylvania.
Stata married Maria married in June, 1962. The two reside in the Boston area, where they raised their son Raymie and daughter Nicole.[1] Raymie graduated from MIT and founded Stata Labs which was acquired by Yahoo! in 2004.[2] In 2010, Yahoo! named Raymie CTO. Later on, Raymie founded Altiscale. Nicole is also a serial entrepreneur having started Deploy Solutions which she sold to Kronos before funding Boston Seed Capital, a seed venture capitalist that invests in early stage startups
Stata earned BSEE and MSEE degrees from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). In 1965, Ray founded Analog Devices, Inc. (ADI) with MIT classmate Matthew Lorber in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Before founding Analog Devices, Stata and Lorber, together with Bill Linko, another MIT graduate, founded Solid State Instruments, a company which was acquired by Kollmorgen Corporation’s Inland Controls Division.[1] Besides ADI and Solid State Instruments, Stata is founder of Stata Venture Partners,[2] a venture capital firm in the Boston area that funded many Boston area startups like Nexabit Networks. In June 1999, Stata Venture Partners was later acquired by Lucent for $960M at the high water mark of the dot-com bubble.[3]
Stata is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering, and was the recipient of the 2003 IEEE Founder’s Medal.[3]
Philanthropy[edit]
‘As co-founder and the first President of the Massachusetts High Technology Council, Stata advocated that engineering education and university research funding were a s
서양야동

Retrospective (Bunny Wailer album)

Retrospective: Classic Tracks From A Legendary Artist

Compilation album by Bunny Wailer

Released
1995

Genre
Reggae

Label
Solomonic/Shanachie

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating

allmusic
[1]

Retrospective is a compilation album of Bunny Wailer’s work from 1986 to 1992.[2] The album was originally released by Wailer’s own Solomonic Music[3]/Shanachie Records in 1995, and was re-released in 2003 by RAS Records.[2]
Track listing[edit]

“Roots, Radics, Rockers, Reggae” 1
“Rock ‘N’ Groove” 2
“Love Fire” 1
“Soul Rebel” 3
“Want to Come Home” 4
“Ballroom Floor” 5
“Rise and Shine” 4
“Cool Runnings” 2
“Rockers” 1
“Liberation” 4
“Time Will Tell” 3
“Warrior” 6
“Dance Hall Music” 7
“Dog War” 6
“Conscious Lyrics” 2
“Redemption Song” 3

11,3,9 taken from In I Father’s House (1979)/Roots Radics Rockers Reggae (1983)
22,8,15 taken from Rock ‘n’ Groove (1981)
34,11,16 taken from Time Will Tell: A Tribute to Bob Marley (1990)
45,7,10 taken from Liberation (1988)
56 taken from Rootsman Skanking (1987)
612,14 taken from Gumption (1990)
713 taken from Marketplace (1985)

References[edit]

^ allmusic review
^ a b Bush, Nathan. “Retrospective Review”. Retrieved December 02 2009.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
^ Retrospective (CD booklet). Bunny Wailer. RAS Records. 2003. p. 2. 06076-89600-2. 

서양야동

Retrospective (Bunny Wailer album)

Retrospective: Classic Tracks From A Legendary Artist

Compilation album by Bunny Wailer

Released
1995

Genre
Reggae

Label
Solomonic/Shanachie

Professional ratings

Review scores

Source
Rating

allmusic
[1]

Retrospective is a compilation album of Bunny Wailer’s work from 1986 to 1992.[2] The album was originally released by Wailer’s own Solomonic Music[3]/Shanachie Records in 1995, and was re-released in 2003 by RAS Records.[2]
Track listing[edit]

“Roots, Radics, Rockers, Reggae” 1
“Rock ‘N’ Groove” 2
“Love Fire” 1
“Soul Rebel” 3
“Want to Come Home” 4
“Ballroom Floor” 5
“Rise and Shine” 4
“Cool Runnings” 2
“Rockers” 1
“Liberation” 4
“Time Will Tell” 3
“Warrior” 6
“Dance Hall Music” 7
“Dog War” 6
“Conscious Lyrics” 2
“Redemption Song” 3

11,3,9 taken from In I Father’s House (1979)/Roots Radics Rockers Reggae (1983)
22,8,15 taken from Rock ‘n’ Groove (1981)
34,11,16 taken from Time Will Tell: A Tribute to Bob Marley (1990)
45,7,10 taken from Liberation (1988)
56 taken from Rootsman Skanking (1987)
612,14 taken from Gumption (1990)
713 taken from Marketplace (1985)

References[edit]

^ allmusic review
^ a b Bush, Nathan. “Retrospective Review”. Retrieved December 02 2009.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
^ Retrospective (CD booklet). Bunny Wailer. RAS Records. 2003. p. 2. 06076-89600-2. 

서양야동